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Mary is Happy, Mary is Happy

MaryMary

Thailand 2013 I 127 mins I cert 15
DVD: Available Now

Hi-So

KinoAsia

Thailand 2010 I 102 mins
DVD: Available Now

36

36_intro

Thailand, 2012 I 68 min I DCP I Thai + English subtitles
DVD: Available Now

Bringing Tibet Home

BTH

US/South Korea/India/Nepal 2013 I 83 mins I cert 15
DVD: Available 29 June 2015

Au Revoir l’été (Hotori no Sakuko)

AquaHolder

Japan 2013 I 126 mins I cert 12A
DVD: Available 31 August 2015

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    36 & Mary Is Happy, Mary Is Happy – double DVD set

    [spb_video link="https://www.youtube.com/watch?lc=DAXCyitRkuDgwtIReY-pjOzVHXHM9uLnQJRBR0LGXxk&v=qc32yu6n_1Q" full_width="yes" width="1/2" el_position="first"] [spb_video link="https://vimeo.com/111747810" full_width="yes" width="1/2" el_position="last"] [blank_spacer height="30px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_text_block title="36" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="1/2" el_position="first"]

    "Strange, without the photo, it's like this never existed..." 36 is a delicate contemplation on the nature of memories in the digital age.

    On the site of a derelict building, location scout Sai meets art director Oom, and they begin working together. Sai records everything on her digital camera, from images of locations to the people in her life. Two years later, Sai is still in the same job, while Oom has moved on. One day her computer crashes, wiping her hard drive, along with the images that capture an entire year of her life. Among them are those she'd taken of Oom... Consisting of 36 shots, 36 is a delicate contemplation on the nature of memories in the digital age.

    Winner - New Currents Award, Busan International Film Festival 2012 Tiger Award Competition Official Selection, International Film Festival Rotterdam 2013

    "this striking debut will cast a spell on viewers who click into its languid and quietly simulating rhythms" - Variety

    "an unexpected gem from Thailand, ‘36', used its three-dozen fixed shots to conjure a sweetly melancholy tale of a girl, a crashed hard drive and lost love" - Time Out

    [/spb_text_block] [spb_text_block title="Mary is Happy, Mary is Happy" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="1/2" el_position="last"]

    A cinematic first! Social media and cinema merge in this adapatation of a Twitter stream consisting of 410 consecutive tweets. A beautifully crafted coming-of-age story following the often absurdly comic as well as emotional trials and tribulations of an unknown teenage girl Mary.

    As high school student Mary prepares to graduate, she is faced with the prospect of change all around her: in life, love and friendship. In the midst of her own internal struggles, strange unrelated things start happening to her and she expresses her uncertainty through her Twitter stream. The film centres around the concept of a scriptwriter’s control over narrative. Thamrongrattanarit as a professional scriptwriter experiments with the idea of letting a real life twitter feed tell a story. Mary’s tweets are those of the real life twitter feed of an anonymous girl, inspiring this whimsical portrait of contemporary youth culture in Asia.

    Official festival selections: Busan International Film Festival 2012, Tokyo International Film Festival 2012, International Film Festival Rotterdam 2013.

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    ★ Winner ★

     

    New Currents Award, Busan International Film Festival 2012

    [/spb_parallax] [blank_spacer height="30px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_single_image image="678" image_size="full" frame="noframe" full_width="no" lightbox="no" link_target="_self" width="1/4" el_position="first"] [spb_text_block title="About the Filmmaker" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="3/4" el_position="last"]

    Nawapol Thamrongrattanarit (b. 1984) is a self-taught director, film critic and screenwriter. He graduated from the Faculty of Arts, Chulalongkorn University, and attended Berlinale Talent Campus in 2007.

    His debut feature film 36 won the New Currents Award at Busan Film Festival 2012 and was also selected for the Tiger Award competition at International Film Festival Rotterdam 2013.

    Nawapol has been nominated for 10 Thai National Film Association (Supannahong) Awards for his second feature film Mary Is Happy, Mary Is Happy, which was also one of three projects selected for the inaugural Venice Biennale College, earning its world premiere at the Venice Film Festival in 2013. The film is currently enjoying its international film festival run, with the European premiere having taken place at International Film Festival Rotterdam in January 2014.

    Nawapol continues to work as a scriptwriter/script supervisor for both independent and mainstream feature films and as a film critic for film and cultural publications. His screenwriting credits include Bangkok Traffic Love Story, Thailand’s highest grossing film in 2009. He is co-founder of Third Class Citizen, a Thai film and video activist group.

    "In the old days, when I started taking photos, waiting for the film to be developed was very exciting. I would get 36 photos that often had nothing to do with each other. Often I wouldn’t remember what the picture was or why I took it. I would have to create my own narrative to connect the events in the photos, sometimes taken months apart. And because my old camera was very simple, many of them were blurred or flared. But even these imperfect pictures made me smile because they represented happy moments in my life.

    "This film is told in a similar fashion, comprising 36 shots that are not directly related to each other. It’s like looking at someone’s roll of film and forming a narrative of a certain period of their life."

    [/spb_text_block] [blank_spacer height="70px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_text_block title="Press" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] fipresci.org (Oct 2012, Pablo Utin) - 36 Variety (Oct 2012, Richard Kuipers) - 36 Cinemas of Asia (Oct 2012, Nawapol Thamrongrattanarit) - 10  Shots of 36 Twitch Film (Nov 2012, Patryk Czekaj) - Five Flavours 2013 Review: 36 Describes A World Composed Of Digital Memories Eye for Film (Jul 2013, Amber Wilkinson) - 36 [/spb_text_block] /
    £17.99
  • Aqua
    Aqua
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    Au Revoir l’été (Hotori no Sakuko)

    [blank_spacer height="30px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_text_block title="Synopsis" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="2/3" el_position="first"]

    Before 18 year old Sakuko starts university, she visits her aunt Mikie in a seemingly sleepy coastal Japanese town. Mikie meets up with old flame Ukichi who now manages the local love motel, whilst Sakuko gets to know a young Fukushima refugee who works there. A web of relationships evolve throughout the summer with a tone flitting between poetic teenage whimsy and raw human anxiety. New Japanese cinema meets French New Wave in a languid summery tale full of subtle complexities reminiscent in style of Eric Rohmer.

    [/spb_text_block] [spb_text_block title="Screenings" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="1/3" el_position="last"]
    Cube Cinema, Bristol7 May 2015
    Hackney Picturehouse, London10 May 2015
    The Ultimate Picture Palace, Oxford30 May & 2 June
    Watch online at FilmDoo
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    ★★★★ The Guardian 

     

    "There is a wonderful charm and a sensuous languor in this Japanese movie" (Peter Bradshaw,  23 April 2015)

     

    ★★★★ Daily Telegraph   ★★★★ The Sunday Times 

     ★★★★ Evening Standard

    [/spb_parallax] [blank_spacer height="30px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_video link="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYYbVVPleuA" full_width="yes" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [blank_spacer height="100px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_single_image image="601" image_size="full" frame="noframe" full_width="no" lightbox="no" link_target="_self" width="1/4" el_position="first"] [spb_text_block title="About the Filmmaker" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="3/4" el_position="last"] Born in Tokyo, Japan, in 1980, Koji Fukada completed his first film The Chairin 2004. In 2006, he wrote and directed his second film, La Grenadière, an animation based on a short story by Honoré de Balzac. Fukada’s last film Hospitalité (2010) enjoyed international festival success and won the Japanese Eye Award at the Toronto International Film Festival.   [/spb_text_block] [blank_spacer height="70px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_text_block title="Press" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] BBC Radio 5 live Kermode & Mayo's Film Review - number 2 in Mark Kermode's top 5 films in UK cinemas (24 April 2015) The Guardian ★★★★: "there is a wonderful charm and a sensuous languor in this Japanese movie" (Peter Bradshaw, 23 April 2015) The Guardian: "Why Au Revoir l'été is the film you should watch this week" (Peter Bradshaw, 24 April 2015) The Sunday Times ★★★★: "Nikaido's intelligent cheerful heroine immediately has you on her side." (Ed Porter, 26 April 2015) The Daily Telegraph ★★★★: "an irresistible mix of the fresh and familiar" (Robbie Collin, 21 April 2015) Evening Standard ★★★★: "you'll be charmed by a drama that has all the demure power of an Eric Rohmer classic" (Charlotte O' Sullivan, 24 April 2015) Little White Lies ★★★: "unequivocal expression of the cultural and political now in modern day Japan" (David Jenkins, 23 April 2015) Time Out ★★★: "a valuable portrait of something like the real Japan" (Trevor Johnston, 20 April 2015) The List ★★★ (Clarisse Loughrey, 20 April 2015) [/spb_text_block] /
    £12.99
  • BTH
    BTH
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    Bringing Tibet Home

    [blank_spacer height="30px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_text_block title="Synopsis" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="2/3" el_position="first"]

    Bringing Tibet Home is the deeply personal debut feature documentary by Tibetan filmmaker Tenzin Tsetan Choklay. The film crew follow from start to finish the New York based Tibetan contemporary artist Tenzing Rigdol while he creates his most ambitious installation yet: The Soil Project. Inspired by his father's dying wish, to once again set foot on Tibetan soil, Rigdol transported soil from Tibet through Nepal to Dharamsala, India, to bring a piece of Tibet to the Tibetan exile community. Choklay films Rigdol's physical and emotional journey to overcome seemingly insurmountable challenges as he navigates the border controls of three countries to smuggle out 20 tons of Tibetan soil. A deeply inspiring portrait of human resilience at its most tested, and a profound example of enduring creativity through times of political turmoil.

    [/spb_text_block] [spb_text_block title="Screenings" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="1/3" el_position="last"] Mac, Birmingham - 1-2 Apr 2015 Hebden Bridge Picture House - 8 Mar 2015 Eden Court, Inverness - 18-19 Feb 2015 The Horse Hospital, London - 26 Jan 2015 + director Q&A Prince Charles Cinema, London - 25 Jan 2015 + director Q&A Wyeside Arts Centre, Builth Wells - 17/21 Jan 2015 Theatr Mwldan, Cardigan - 16-22 Jan 2015 Aberystwyth Arts Centre - 14 Jan 2015 Glasgow Film Theatre 29-30 Dec 2014 Platform, London 14 Dec 2014 The Proud Archivist, London 13 Dec 2014 [/spb_text_block] [blank_spacer height="30px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_parallax bg_image="690" bg_type="cover" alt_background="none" el_class="minheight" width="1/1" el_position="first last"]

    ★★★★ Total Film 

     

    "Bringing Tibet Home has a great deal to say about human suffering and the tragedy of a nation exiled from its own land by colonising forces. It’s rousing, quietly impassioned stuff"

     

    ★★★★ Little White Lies   ★★★ Time Out

     ★★★ Empire

    [/spb_parallax] [blank_spacer height="30px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_video link="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxOJQusz4xQ" full_width="yes" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [blank_spacer height="100px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_single_image image="688" image_size="full" frame="noframe" full_width="no" lightbox="no" link_target="_self" width="1/4" el_position="first"] [spb_text_block title="About the Filmmaker" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="3/4" el_position="last"]

    Director’s Statement

    Bringing Tibet Home is a special project for me. Although it tells the story of artist Tenzing Rigdol, in a way I am also telling my own story through his experiences. Like Tenzing Rigdol, my parents also escaped from Tibet after 1959 and have not been able to return home since.

    As Tibetans born and raised in exile, this desire to see our homeland is very real and it is a part of our daily existence. When Tenzing Rigdol first told me about his plans to bring 20,000 kilograms of native soil from Tibet to India, I had no doubt that if he succeeded, he would be able to touch the hearts of thousands of Tibetans living in exile and somehow give each of us a sense of relief and joy in this time of despair.

    As a filmmaker I felt that through this film I could share a very special experience with other Tibetans and the larger international community. In this day and age, a great number of us spend our lives away from our homes, some by choice and some due to circumstances. And of course speaking of art, I think Tenzing Rigdol's Soil Project sets a new and a very high standard not just for the world of conceptual art but for art which carries real meaning and purpose. These are some of the reasons why I decided to make this film.

     – Tenzin Tsetan Choklay

     Tenzin Tsetan Choklay: Director, Producer, Cinematographer & Editor

    Tenzin Tsetan Choklay (b. 1979) is a New York-based Tibetan filmmaker. Born to Tibetan refugee parents, Tenzin grew up in Dharamsala in northern India. He studied directing at the Korean Academy of Film Arts in Seoul, South Korea. His past films include a number of short films including History of Momos (2007), Elif's Seoulitude (2007) and Tell Tale (2008). He was also Associate Producer for the documentary The Sun Behind the CloudsBringing Tibet Home is Tenzin’s debut feature documentary.

     Tenzing Rigdol

    Tenzing Rigdol is one of the most well known contemporary Tibetan artists based in the United States. His work ranges from paintings, sculptures, drawings, and digital media to video installations and site-specific performance pieces. He has exhibited extensively throughout the United States as well as in many different cities around the world.

    His artwork is held in major museums and collections worldwide including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. He is represented by Rossi and Rossi Gallery, London.

    Tenzing Rigdol was born in Kathmandu, Nepal, in 1982 to Tibetan refugee parents. He went to school in India and Nepal and later moved to the United States to pursue his interest in art. He studied at the University of Colorado at Denver and graduated in 2004 with a degree in Fine Art and Art History. Tenzing is also an accomplished poet and three of his books have been published by the Tibet Writes group. Tenzing currently resides in Queens, New York City.

    [/spb_text_block] [blank_spacer height="70px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_text_block title="Press" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] ★★★★ Little White Lies - "Gripping and disciplined documentary storytelling" ★★★★ Total Film "Bringing Tibet Home has a great deal to say about human suffering and the tragedy of a nation exiled from its own land by colonising forces. It’s rousing, quietly impassioned stuff" ★★★ Time Out - "the climactic unveiling of his remarkable artwork is a moment of sheer, awestruck joy" ★★★ Empire - "A heartfelt and fascinating piece of documentary-as-art" [/spb_text_block] /
    £13.99
  • KinoAsia
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    Hi-So

    [spb_video link="https://vimeo.com/60544969" full_width="yes" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [blank_spacer height="30px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_text_block title="Synopsis" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="2/3" el_position="first"]

    Set against the backdrop of a post-tsunami Thailand, Aditya Assarat's second film features Thai film star Ananda Everingham in a bittersweet tale of love, memories and belonging.

    Returning to Thailand after studying in the US, Ananda (played by leading Thailand based actor Ananda Everingham) lands a part in a new film and finds himself swept up in a whirlwind of success. When American girlfriend Zoe turns up to visit, she soon begins to feel shut out and the distance between them grows as Ananda becomes increasingly absorbed with his role in the film. His attention soon turns to May from the film’s production crew, and so as one relationship fades, another ignites. All the while, Ananda finds himself revisiting his past and reflecting on his present – from the building he grew up in and a Bangkok he once knew, to two cultures that he is now caught between.

    Official festival selections: Pusan Film Festival 2010, Berlinale 2011 [/spb_text_block] [spb_text_block title="Forthcoming Screenings" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="1/3" el_position="last"]
    The Proud Archivist 25 June 2014
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    ★★★★ The Guardian 

     

    “Assarat shares Apichatpong Weerasethakul's ability to conjure delicate moods and memories...“ (Mike McCahill, Mar 2013)

     

    ★★★★ Time Out

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    Aditya Assarat was born in Bangkok, Thailand. He studied film production at the University of Southern California. He started his career by making his thesis film Motorcycle (2000) which was the first Thai film to compete in Clermont-Ferrand, Tampere, Oberhausen and Sundance. His other shorts include Waiting (2002),Boy Genius (2004), and The Sigh (2005) which together won fifteen awards. In 2006, he started the production company Pop Pictures to produce his debut featureWonderful Town (2007).

    The film, supported by Rolex, the Hubert Bals Fund, the Sundance Annenberg Fund, and the Pusan Asian Cinema Fund, won the New Currents Award at Pusan and Tiger Award at Rotterdam.

    Director's Statement

    I think this project should start with voices, it should get the voices right. We talk in our own language and it sounds like no other language in the world. It’s a mix of Thai and English and probably nobody can understand it except people who know both languages. If you know one but not the other, then only half of it makes sense. In this way, we’re no different from a tribe. So my approach is to shoot a documentary about a tribe of youth. It’s a new tribe which only recently came into being. A century ago, if you were born in Thailand, it meant something definite. It meant you spoke Thai, probably never left your country, maybe never even left your town. But nowadays, with low cost airlines and internet, things aren’t so simple. New tribes have sprouted up around the world that are not defined by national borders but by education, taste and opportunity. On Facebook, I have some 300 friends. Most of them don’t live in this country but I have more in common with them than people who live down the street: favourite movies, favourite music, favourite books. We’re all the same, a pop tribe sprouted from pop stuff.

    Things change quickly, so this film should be a snapshot of the way things are now. Like a Polaroid, as soon as you take it, it’s already fading into the past. This year has been one of changes. The political mess we’re in isn’t a beginning nor an end. It’s the culmination of nothing. I think it’s a marker on the road, stretching far back and far ahead, and we're just standing in the middle. I feel it: old things dying away, new things being formed. So I want to express these changes in the spaces around me. Thailand is not a large country, about the same as an average US state or an eastern European country. But it’s filled with such contrasts. From the sea and sky of the south to the dense grey and glass blocks of the city, the disparity is staring you in the face.

    Ananda asked me, “Hey, you think anyone is going to get any of this besides us?". "Yeah," I lied. The truth is the people who are going to get this are my 300 some Facebook friends. But I think in the future, more people will join our little tribe. It might become so big it will no longer be a tribe, but the mainstream. Maybe they can pull out this Polaroid and recognise themselves in it.

    Aditya Assarat

    September 2009

    [/spb_text_block] [blank_spacer height="70px" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] [spb_text_block title="Press" pb_margin_bottom="no" pb_border_bottom="no" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] The Guardian ★★★★ “Assarat shares Apichatpong Weerasethakul's ability to conjure delicate moods and memories...“ (Mike McCahill, Mar 2013) Time Out ★★★★
    “...those attuned to the quiet desolation of an Antonioni or Hou Hsiao-Hsien will find much to admire. A welcome discovery“ (Trevor Johnston, Feb 2013)
    Sight & Sound “...skillfully crafted images do succeed in defining moods of ennui and dislocation and are none the worse for echoing Antonionii and Edward Yang.” (Tony Rayns, Mar 2013) Screen International "An absorbing and beguilingly simple film... beautifully haunting and effortlessly cool" (Mark Adams, Chief Film Critic, Nov 2010) AnOther (Mar 2013) Indie London (Feb 2013) Movie Emporium (Feb 2013) The Right Copy (Feb 2013) Bangkok Online (Oct 2011)   [/spb_text_block] /
    £12.99
  • MaryMary
    MaryMary
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    Mary is Happy, Mary is Happy Ltd Edition T-Shirt

    [spb_video link="https://vimeo.com/78629606" full_width="yes" width="1/1" el_position="first last"] /
    £12.99
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